Jump to content
Illinois Marching Online
Sign in to follow this  
ilikeband

Marian band article

Recommended Posts

1. My assumption is that directors can make more and retire sooner in the public school system. I"m sure there are exceptions.

2. A school system has to WANT TO pursue a premier competitive program, and directors have to have the fire to do so. I'd argue more schools don't do it because they don't WANT to, don't see the value, and directors don't push it.

I agree with most of what Robes says.

Exactly -- no argument from me. The point is that many schools (not all, but many) COULD choose to do so, they just don't for whatever reason. Your first point also makes my point for me. That's one reason why directors may choose public over private -- sounds like an "advantage" to me. :)

 

How are either of your points different from mine? In fact, they both bolster my contention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also never said Marian was in a "grossly rich neighborhood (like Carmel)"....in fact, I think if you go back and read a bit, you'll notice that I said that Marian should be absolutely commended and probably has one of (if not THE) lowest budget of all the BOA finalists, and probably most of the BOA semi-finalists.

 

Just a question for robes so I understand the point - and not a rhetorical one, I really am interested in the opinion. If Marian can compete successfully against those semi-finalists and finalists when its budget is one of the lowest of the group, why do we not think that schools like Limestone can succeed against Marian? Is it that there is a budgetary floor that must be reached before a school can compete at that level in this day and age, and many schools can't reach that floor? Just trying to understand where you are going with this. I initially thought the question was whether Limestone today is similar to Marian in the 70s, but as I mentioned earlier I think it is an unhelpful comparison because though I think they may be similar, the level of competition and the marching band atmosphere is not similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just another FYI from me.

Success = Support = Money.

 

Up until the last four years, Limestone hasn't had a real good band program.

 

But they have had a very successful broadcasting station within the school over the past decade.

So much so that the school has put at least $70,000 into the broadcasting station over the last two years (including two new cameras, a new technical director station, four new computers, three new hand held cameras, a low end green screen, and two new monitors for another computer).

And I don't see any other school within the area with a broadcasting station (and if there is, I haven't seen on as good as Limestone's).

 

Now Limestone's band is rising rather quickly to success, soon more focus will be on the band than on, lets say the football team, or the speech team, or the drama club. If the band is still successful than the school is going to put more money into them, expecting more back, because the band's success reflects the schools success as teachers and an institution of education.

 

Bartonville may not have a population of 30,000+ people, they may not have as many kids, they may not have as many programs or as many staff members who have master degrees or doctorates but they are not as poor as you think.

 

 

We are just going to have to wait and see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just another FYI from me.

Success = Support = Money.

 

Up until the last four years, Limestone hasn't had a real good band program.

 

But they have had a very successful broadcasting station within the school over the past decade.

So much so that the school has put at least $70,000 into the broadcasting station over the last two years (including two new cameras, a new technical director station, four new computers, three new hand held cameras, a low end green screen, and two new monitors for another computer).

And I don't see any other school within the area with a broadcasting station (and if there is, I haven't seen on as good as Limestone's).

 

Now Limestone's band is rising rather quickly to success, soon more focus will be on the band than on, lets say the football team, or the speech team, or the drama club. If the band is still successful than the school is going to put more money into them, expecting more back, because the band's success reflects the schools success as teachers and an institution of education.

 

Bartonville may not have a population of 30,000+ people, they may not have as many kids, they may not have as many programs or as many staff members who have master degrees or doctorates but they are not as poor as you think.

 

 

We are just going to have to wait and see.

Interesting about the broadcasting program.

 

Not to go off topic too much, but I'd like to hear more about this

 

Is this a station that broadcasts over the air (i.e., outside the school)? If so, how far do they transmit? HOw many hours a day?

 

Are we talking about tv or radio, or both?

 

What kind of programming is it (music, talk, news, entertainment shows, all of the above)?

 

Is this a class driven activity (elective) or is it an extra-curricular activity (like a club)? Or a mixture?

 

What was the genesis of this program? I mean, how did the school get into this in the first place?

 

Sorry for going off topic, but it never ceases to amaze me how different schools/communities find a niche in different areas. There was that one high school that every year sent kids to the Johnny Carson show because they excelled at bird calls. How does a school become known for that???!!!! :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just another FYI from me.

Success = Support = Money.

 

Up until the last four years, Limestone hasn't had a real good band program.

 

But they have had a very successful broadcasting station within the school over the past decade.

So much so that the school has put at least $70,000 into the broadcasting station over the last two years (including two new cameras, a new technical director station, four new computers, three new hand held cameras, a low end green screen, and two new monitors for another computer).

And I don't see any other school within the area with a broadcasting station (and if there is, I haven't seen on as good as Limestone's).

 

Now Limestone's band is rising rather quickly to success, soon more focus will be on the band than on, lets say the football team, or the speech team, or the drama club. If the band is still successful than the school is going to put more money into them, expecting more back, because the band's success reflects the schools success as teachers and an institution of education.

 

Bartonville may not have a population of 30,000+ people, they may not have as many kids, they may not have as many programs or as many staff members who have master degrees or doctorates but they are not as poor as you think.

 

 

We are just going to have to wait and see.

Well ropes it seems like I don't get to poke the holes all by myself. It sounds like Uber_panda may be from Limestone and taking what Uber has said into consideration it seems to me that your argument might be out of order. Meaning that the money isn't what is needed first but comes after the success and support. Seems they can find the money if they get the success and support first. Now I am not saying that this is true in all cases. Limestone afterall was your example. Hmm....very interesting.

 

Here is to hoping Limestone does great things in the future!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting about the broadcasting program.

 

Not to go off topic too much, but I'd like to hear more about this

 

Is this a station that broadcasts over the air (i.e., outside the school)? If so, how far do they transmit? HOw many hours a day?

 

Are we talking about tv or radio, or both?

 

What kind of programming is it (music, talk, news, entertainment shows, all of the above)?

 

Is this a class driven activity (elective) or is it an extra-curricular activity (like a club)? Or a mixture?

 

What was the genesis of this program? I mean, how did the school get into this in the first place?

 

Sorry for going off topic, but it never ceases to amaze me how different schools/communities find a niche in different areas. There was that one high school that every year sent kids to the Johnny Carson show because they excelled at bird calls. How does a school become known for that???!!!! :)

 

I'll inject here for 2 seconds about a broadcasting program that I know about. Homewood-Flossmoor has both a radio and tv station. The tv station does stuff inside the school, such as school news, sports, weather, and what's going on over the weekend. The radio station has a few weekly programs that are done by students that I work with. Also, their radio station transmits at 1,500 watts, which makes it the largest high school station in the country.

 

The radio station also has documentaries done by the students in broadcasting classes. To get from Broadcasting 2 to Broadcasting 3 (I think), each student must present a 55 minute live documentary on the subject of their choice. It's kind of humorous watching these kids I work with freak out over this.

 

http://www.hfhighschool.org/hfmain/activities/vikingmedia/VBC_Site/WHFH.html

http://www.hfhighschool.org/hfmain/activities/vikingmedia/VBC_Site/VTV.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha, ok a little off topic, but here it goes.

 

It started circa 1996, I don't really know how this all started, but I'm assuming it would go some thing like "Hey, the kids want to do this, so lets try it, and if it works out, we'll keep on doing it."

 

And so far it is only a television broadcast within the school, but they record every episode and post it on their website (http://www.lchstv.com/) for both the kids and the parents to watch. It's teacher supervised, but besides that all student run.

 

Students are assigned weekly task to do so they can run it on air, i.e. introduction videos and credits. Also included are specials on either extracurriculars that go on within the school or community. Very recently they just started showing a dramedy miniseries with it's own cast and storyline and writing staff.

 

The class is a credited course, but you have to do the majority of the work outside of school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you explain a problem like Maria...n Catholic?

 

I have decided to jump back into this no-win situation because I am bored and you guys make me laugh.

 

Personally, I think Marian Catholic is quite overpriced for a high school education, but be that as it may, I am reasonably certain that they base their reputation on academic performance and a student's willingness to contribute to additional facets of their community. I am almost positive that they are more willing to take borderline academic qualifying students if:

 

1) They want to enhance the programs that are already there by joining (fine arts, school/service clubs, etc..thus showcasing character, etc.

 

2) They qualify academically and have family in the school.

 

3) They attend a Catholic grade school (My school almost mandated this but I know that Marian Catholic does not).

 

That $9,000-per-student figure is probably not much different than what TAXPAYERS spend-per-student at the public school level, if not much less. Who's to say that Marian Catholic turns a profit? My bet is they reinvest any money they do make into infrastructure improvements and their general fund. The private school I attended charged a similiar amount in tuition (back in the 1990s!), but even they had to rely on their religious order to fill in budgetary holes created by the staff necessary to keep class sizes down, etc. People send their kids to private schools for the smaller class sizes and that is a huge selling point when you're asking for someone's money.

 

I don't see how the band program directly benefits any more than citizens within a school district who vote on tax increases to support their home school district. I'm sure that it helps Marian Catholic to have a nationally-recognized band program (and the school is likely MORE receptive to admitting students to that program or any within their school where freshmen can fill a need), but their program alone does not trump the school's agenda. Five-of-every-six students that attend Marian do not participate in the band (see: Chicago Tribune features) and there is way more to high school than marching band. What about the other 1,000+ students?

 

This is not an underperforming private school who will accept anyone or is trying to singularly pump up the band program or athletic program because that's all they have (i.e. Mount Carmel High School). Marian Catholic has turned into an elite institution, but nonetheless one that is known for academic offerings. They draw from the south suburbs of Chicago: I don't know of many rich areas in that geographical area. I don't see Chicago Heights, Olympia Fields, Matteson, Richton Park, Ford Heights, Dolton, Riverdale, Steger, South Holland, Midlothian, Oak Forest, Oak Lawn, Evergreen Park, Blue Island producing too many kazillionaires. I see more problems than solutions in most of those areas. There are some suburbs that probably feed into their school that are somewhat affluent, but don't you see how crazy this sounds? GO to Brentwood, TN and tell me that their high school doesn't benefit by having multi-million dollar homes of country music legends lining the hills around their high school.

 

I wouldn't live in the south suburbs if you paid me to, but they manage to shine in CHICAGO HEIGHTS? Come on.

 

References: Attended affluent private high school for four years; academic-heavy, not much else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haha, ok a little off topic, but here it goes.

 

It started circa 1996, I don't really know how this all started, but I'm assuming it would go some thing like "Hey, the kids want to do this, so lets try it, and if it works out, we'll keep on doing it."

 

And so far it is only a television broadcast within the school, but they record every episode and post it on their website (http://www.lchstv.com/) for both the kids and the parents to watch. It's teacher supervised, but besides that all student run.

 

Students are assigned weekly task to do so they can run it on air, i.e. introduction videos and credits. Also included are specials on either extracurriculars that go on within the school or community. Very recently they just started showing a dramedy miniseries with it's own cast and storyline and writing staff.

 

The class is a credited course, but you have to do the majority of the work outside of school.

Thanks for the info.

 

I love the part about the dramedy miniseries!!

 

I wonder how many kids go on to pursue broadcasting degrees in college and/or careers.

 

And, Dan, thanks for the bit on H-F as well. I do seem to remember hearing about that back in the day, but had forgotten.

 

Anyway, sorry for the detour ... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few go into broadcasting in college, only one of them has really succeeded (from what I know) and now works on the set of Big Brother.

 

Oh and one last thing:

But back in the day, (I may get the dates wrong on this but here it goes) Limestone was an absolute MONSTER of a band back in the late 70s through the 80's.

Under the direction of a Mr. Cunningham, the band had almost 250 kids.

 

Just goes to show that the director really is the #1 factor for bands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How do you explain a problem like Maria...n Catholic?

 

I have decided to jump back into this no-win situation because I am bored and you guys make me laugh.

 

Personally, I think Marian Catholic is quite overpriced for a high school education, but be that as it may, I am reasonably certain that they base their reputation on academic performance and a student's willingness to contribute to additional facets of their community. I am almost positive that they are more willing to take borderline academic qualifying students if:

 

1) They want to enhance the programs that are already there by joining (fine arts, school/service clubs, etc..thus showcasing character, etc.

 

2) They qualify academically and have family in the school.

 

3) They attend a Catholic grade school (My school almost mandated this but I know that Marian Catholic does not).

 

That $9,000-per-student figure is probably not much different than what TAXPAYERS spend-per-student at the public school level, if not much less. Who's to say that Marian Catholic turns a profit? My bet is they reinvest any money they do make into infrastructure improvements and their general fund. The private school I attended charged a similiar amount in tuition (back in the 1990s!), but even they had to rely on their religious order to fill in budgetary holes created by the staff necessary to keep class sizes down, etc. People send their kids to private schools for the smaller class sizes and that is a huge selling point when you're asking for someone's money.

 

I don't see how the band program directly benefits any more than citizens within a school district who vote on tax increases to support their home school district. I'm sure that it helps Marian Catholic to have a nationally-recognized band program (and the school is likely MORE receptive to admitting students to that program or any within their school where freshmen can fill a need), but their program alone does not trump the school's agenda. Five-of-every-six students that attend Marian do not participate in the band (see: Chicago Tribune features) and there is way more to high school than marching band. What about the other 1,000+ students?

 

This is not an underperforming private school who will accept anyone or is trying to singularly pump up the band program or athletic program because that's all they have (i.e. Mount Carmel High School). Marian Catholic has turned into an elite institution, but nonetheless one that is known for academic offerings. They draw from the south suburbs of Chicago: I don't know of many rich areas in that geographical area. I don't see Chicago Heights, Olympia Fields, Matteson, Richton Park, Ford Heights, Dolton, Riverdale, Steger, South Holland, Midlothian, Oak Forest, Oak Lawn, Evergreen Park, Blue Island producing too many kazillionaires. I see more problems than solutions in most of those areas. There are some suburbs that probably feed into their school that are somewhat affluent, but don't you see how crazy this sounds? GO to Brentwood, TN and tell me that their high school doesn't benefit by having multi-million dollar homes of country music legends lining the hills around their high school.

 

I wouldn't live in the south suburbs if you paid me to, but they manage to shine in CHICAGO HEIGHTS? Come on.

 

References: Attended affluent private high school for four years; academic-heavy, not much else.

You are right that this is a no win situation.

 

Do I think marian is over-priced. It is not cheap but if I felt overpriced was the right word I'm not sure I would want to do it. Was really more of an acedemic choice than economic if you know what I mean. For admittance does attending a Catholic grade school help? I would tend to think there is a little more flexibility if you did. My son didn't attend a Catholic grade school but did very well on on the entrance exams, so it wasn't an issue for us. Not going to go on what I have heard from others, just my personal experience. I know that having siblings in the school matters and helps at admission time. I do not know if they take boarderline qualifying students to enhance their programs, I don't know if you are given the opportunity to plead your case or not. Not saying it does or does not happen. I don't know. You raise an inteesting point. If the tuition is so high to benefit the band because they are successful does that mean the 5 out of 6 students who are not in the band are somehow cheated?

 

The south suburbs are not lined with Mcmansions but I don't think they quite are as bad as you are portraying them to be either. There are towns I definitely would not want to live in but there are some that are just your average working class towns. And certainly more affordable than many other north and west burbs. Not to pick on Naperville but I work with someone who lives there and while their house is nice, it is no Mcmansion either and they pay over 12 grand a year in property taxes to Dupage county. That is more than my Marian tuition bill.

 

I'm still waiting for an answer from robes on my last post about what uber_panda said. I would be interested to hear it and unfortunately don't have anymore time to play on here tonight. I looked at all the posts that happened between 5 last night and 9 this morning. You all have been very busy. Economic statistics and all. Your comparisons like you noted are a little flawed because you don't know the average family income of the school involved and as noted that would be a little difficult to get at best. Not sure what the point of all that was.

 

Happy to keep you entertained :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marian Cathlic is an amazing band. limestone is working there band up. the old saying "rome wasn't built in a day" fits perfectly here. limestone has a good program and so does marian. limestone is getting better every year. remember how we were 2 or 3 years ago? their is no sense fighting over this. Me, being a limestone student really enjoyed Marian's 2009 show and at boa grand nationals i made it a point to tell a band parent that, since i didnt see any of their members, that they did great. I wish both bands success in the up comming season. Mr. Bimm and Mr. Empey are great band directors and consequently have great bands, there is no denying that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha wow...not to be a killjoy (I know that forums are meant for discussion and they can get quite lively at times), but look what this has turned into. A thread created to let people know about a newspaper article on Marian has turned into a rather polarizing debate about program finances and their effect on program success, and now a Limestone student has inevitably seen it and given his/her 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for noticing my error. *crys and blows his nose on his gloves* I just got done reading ten pages. Alot has gone on, though i did like the article. i thought it was Cool that a newspaper like the Chicago tribune would write about a marching band. I was talking to my parents about how amazing marian show was and my mother told me about some family members who went there. i guess i can see both side of the spectrum. two amazing bands. not to mention when my cousin came here from minnesota she called us all corn fed kids. and that it isnt natural for so many good bands to be in one state.

 

Edit: I dont want to join the debate. I would just embarress myself. i just wanted to point out that both bands are good and it looked like a good place to point out that i enjoyed their show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haha wow...not to be a killjoy (I know that forums are meant for discussion and they can get quite lively at times), but look what this has turned into. A thread created to let people know about a newspaper article on Marian has turned into a rather polarizing debate about program finances and their effect on program success, and now a Limestone student has inevitably seen it and given his/her 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for noticing my error. *crys and blows his nose on his gloves* I just got done reading ten pages. Alot has gone on, though i did like the article. i thought it was Cool that a newspaper like the Chicago tribune would write about a marching band. I was talking to my parents about how amazing marian show was and my mother told me about some family members who went there. i guess i can see both side of the spectrum. two amazing bands. not to mention when my cousin came here from minnesota she called us all corn fed kids. and that it isnt natural for so many good bands to be in one state.

 

Edit: I dont want to join the debate. I would just embarress myself. i just wanted to point out that both bands are good and it looked like a good place to point out that i enjoyed their show.

You are not embarrassing yourself. I do have a question for you though. If you are a student what are you doing up at 2am posting to this forum on a school night? Alright, I'm kidding. Your band looked great when I saw them at ISU.

 

And what exactly is a corn fed kid? Is that supposed to be good or bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...not to mention when my cousin came here from minnesota she called us all corn fed kids. and that it isnt natural for so many good bands to be in one state.

 

And what exactly is a corn fed kid? Is that supposed to be good or bad?

 

All us Midwestern hicks who live on farms and eat corn all the time are corn fed kids. Personally I make fun of people from Iowa for their corn more than Illinois...then again why would I stereotype my own state? :P

 

Fun fact: Dining halls at U of Iowa serve corn 3 meals a day as well as serving it as a condiment. (I kindly remind my friend who attends school there of this frequently)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...not to mention when my cousin came here from minnesota she called us all corn fed kids. and that it isnt natural for so many good bands to be in one state.

 

And what exactly is a corn fed kid? Is that supposed to be good or bad?

 

All us Midwestern hicks who live on farms and eat corn all the time are corn fed kids. Personally I make fun of people from Iowa for their corn more than Illinois...then again why would I stereotype my own state? :P

 

Fun fact: Dining halls at U of Iowa serve corn 3 meals a day as well as serving it as a condiment. (I kindly remind my friend who attends school there of this frequently)

Oh I get it, farmer jokes. Guess us goofy city folks are just slow to the farm humor. Next question, How is corn a condiment? Is that like corn sauce? and what does one put it on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just another FYI from me.

Success = Support = Money.

 

Up until the last four years, Limestone hasn't had a real good band program.

 

But they have had a very successful broadcasting station within the school over the past decade.

So much so that the school has put at least $70,000 into the broadcasting station over the last two years (including two new cameras, a new technical director station, four new computers, three new hand held cameras, a low end green screen, and two new monitors for another computer).

And I don't see any other school within the area with a broadcasting station (and if there is, I haven't seen on as good as Limestone's).

 

Now Limestone's band is rising rather quickly to success, soon more focus will be on the band than on, lets say the football team, or the speech team, or the drama club. If the band is still successful than the school is going to put more money into them, expecting more back, because the band's success reflects the schools success as teachers and an institution of education.

 

Bartonville may not have a population of 30,000+ people, they may not have as many kids, they may not have as many programs or as many staff members who have master degrees or doctorates but they are not as poor as you think.

 

 

We are just going to have to wait and see.

Well ropes it seems like I don't get to poke the holes all by myself. It sounds like Uber_panda may be from Limestone and taking what Uber has said into consideration it seems to me that your argument might be out of order. Meaning that the money isn't what is needed first but comes after the success and support. Seems they can find the money if they get the success and support first. Now I am not saying that this is true in all cases. Limestone afterall was your example. Hmm....very interesting.

 

Here is to hoping Limestone does great things in the future!!

So...you view the fact that Limestone has invested $70,000 (which I've not been able to find a link for anywhere, not saying it isn't true, but saying I don't know if that number is accurate) in a program that is:

 

A) Curricular

B) Technology-based (which is all the rage, and many times reimbursed by the state or by grants that can be applied for all over the state)

 

is an indication that they then also have $40,000 a year to spend on a marching band program? Per year?

 

If you view that as a "hole" in my argument, then you don't know much about public schools. Technology and curricular instruction will ALWAYS be funded more than fine arts. ALWAYS.

 

Maybe things are different at private schools.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just another FYI from me.

Success = Support = Money.

 

Up until the last four years, Limestone hasn't had a real good band program.

 

But they have had a very successful broadcasting station within the school over the past decade.

So much so that the school has put at least $70,000 into the broadcasting station over the last two years (including two new cameras, a new technical director station, four new computers, three new hand held cameras, a low end green screen, and two new monitors for another computer).

And I don't see any other school within the area with a broadcasting station (and if there is, I haven't seen on as good as Limestone's).

 

Now Limestone's band is rising rather quickly to success, soon more focus will be on the band than on, lets say the football team, or the speech team, or the drama club. If the band is still successful than the school is going to put more money into them, expecting more back, because the band's success reflects the schools success as teachers and an institution of education.

 

Bartonville may not have a population of 30,000+ people, they may not have as many kids, they may not have as many programs or as many staff members who have master degrees or doctorates but they are not as poor as you think.

 

 

We are just going to have to wait and see.

Well ropes it seems like I don't get to poke the holes all by myself. It sounds like Uber_panda may be from Limestone and taking what Uber has said into consideration it seems to me that your argument might be out of order. Meaning that the money isn't what is needed first but comes after the success and support. Seems they can find the money if they get the success and support first. Now I am not saying that this is true in all cases. Limestone afterall was your example. Hmm....very interesting.

 

Here is to hoping Limestone does great things in the future!!

So...you view the fact that Limestone has invested $70,000 (which I've not been able to find a link for anywhere, not saying it isn't true, but saying I don't know if that number is accurate) in a program that is:

 

A) Curricular

B) Technology-based (which is all the rage, and many times reimbursed by the state or by grants that can be applied for all over the state)

 

is an indication that they then also have $40,000 a year to spend on a marching band program? Per year?

 

If you view that as a "hole" in my argument, then you don't know much about public schools. Technology and curricular instruction will ALWAYS be funded more than fine arts. ALWAYS.

 

Maybe things are different at private schools.

 

robes- I think you are missing the point I was trying to make. Try the paragraph that starts out: "Now Limestone's band is rising...." Or more specifically the second sentence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quoting limited to 3 levels deep

So...you view the fact that Limestone has invested $70,000 (which I've not been able to find a link for anywhere, not saying it isn't true, but saying I don't know if that number is accurate) in a program that is:

 

A) Curricular

B) Technology-based (which is all the rage, and many times reimbursed by the state or by grants that can be applied for all over the state)

 

is an indication that they then also have $40,000 a year to spend on a marching band program? Per year?

 

If you view that as a "hole" in my argument, then you don't know much about public schools. Technology and curricular instruction will ALWAYS be funded more than fine arts. ALWAYS.

 

Maybe things are different at private schools.

 

robes- I think you are missing the point I was trying to make. Try the paragraph that starts out: "Now Limestone's band is rising...." Or more specifically the second sentence.
I'm afraid the paragraph you are referring to just isn't an accurate depiction of how most schools seem to work. I know of a number of programs that have become very successful without much money, or an increase in funding over the years, and the schools still want to take more money away from those successful programs. At most high schools, the band can be very successful, but they will never spend as much money per child in band, as they do the athletics. This is sad because this is tax payer money and should be spent fairly and evenly. Also, music will create a stronger academic environment....sports do not.

 

If schools want better test scores, even out the spending between athletics and music and the arts. I'm confident that it would be money better spent.

 

Basically, most administrations don't really care if the band is competitive or successful...they just want a pep band at halftime (only referring to Illinois, I know other states do care about the success of the marching and all music programs)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and one last thing:

But back in the day, (I may get the dates wrong on this but here it goes) Limestone was an absolute MONSTER of a band back in the late 70s through the 80's.

Under the direction of a Mr. Cunningham, the band had almost 250 kids.

 

Just goes to show that the director really is the #1 factor for bands.

No, it doesn't show that.

 

Back in the 70's, marching band involved kids, instruments, uniforms, and making freaking letters on the field. Limestone's band of the 1970's and 80's was never competitive on the national scale.

 

Competitive marching band's genesis began in the late 1970's, and was still very basic and rudimentary.

 

Greg Bimm was a pioneer in this field, beginning in simpler times. His focus on competitive marching band earned he and his program much success and recognition. As the 70's gave way to the 80's, he was also able to build up his program incrementally, and it was during these years when the expenses for marching band started getting more hefty. The 90's got more expensive, but year by year, Bimm was able to increase a little bit more. In addition, the name Marian Catholic was recognized, resulting in continued success which fueled his ability to build the program further.

 

Take a look at BOA now. Bimm and Marian Catholic are still at the top because they got success at first, and didn't want to lose that. The school and parents have been willing (and able) to dole out more and more money as the activity has gotten more advanced. And the name Marian Catholic has helped Marian to stay successful. This is why Marian can go to an early show, be dirtier than all sin, and still win over bands that are cleaner and more polished at that point in the season.

 

Limestone (and other smaller bands) don't have the same situation. For them, the money that it takes to actually compete at the highest levels is unrealistic, plus you're dealing with a geographical issue. I contend that Limestone will continue to do well, but they will never be able to reach the levels of funding that they need to be on par with the top BOA bands, Marian included. Time will tell, and I'm more than willing to visit this board 10 years from now to see who ended up right.

 

Interestingly enough, we almost have already seen where the Limestone experiment will go...we watched Dan Moore get his start at Limestone and have success, but then abandon the program due to a "glass ceiling" of funding and head up to Naperville North. Will the same thing happen this time? For Limestone's sake, I hope not. But the reality of the situation is that Limestone does not have the same financial ability to support an extra-curricular marching band as Marian Catholic does. Spin all you want, but it's just the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×